There are many theories, some backed by data, that show Google uses user metrics such as bounce rate, click through rate, time on site, etc. when determining the relevancy of a piece of content to the searcher’s query. SEO today is increasingly driven by natural language search, that is, people doing searches that are more like normal questions than two or three keywords. Using structured data, you can serve Google your address details in the most convenient way. SEO takes some time. There’s no legitimate way around that. But SEO is also not a one-and-done activity. You can’t SEO a website and call it good. If you want to stay competitive, then SEO shouldn’t stop just because you’ve started seeing results.

Removing the guesswork from SEO

Google started penalizing mobile unfriendly sites in 2015. And they’re likely crack down even more in the future. If you want to make your site mobile-friendly, I recommend Responsive Design. Make sure your backlinks appear to be natural. Don’t ask webmasters to link back to your pages with a specific anchor text since this can haphazardly result in a pattern that may get noticed by search engines and cause you to get a linking penalty. Make sure to evaluate your articles in the SERPs. Google the terms you’ve optimized your articles for. Check whether or not your SEO is paying off! Search engines typically assume that the more popular a site, page, or document, the more valuable the information it contains must be.

Let the world know you are creating fabulous content

A clear understanding of searcher’s intent will help the webmaster to create the content accordingly and users will get appropriate answers for their query. Hence, understanding the user perspective becomes really important. Search engine optimization, while a very technical practice, is a marketing function—and it needs to be treated like one. Try to improve your site speed and page load times, and make sure that your site is mobile-optimized to maximize your chances of getting sitelinks on mobile. By using internal linking strategically, you can boost the ranking of other pages on your website. Say you have a popular page that is ranking highly in Google and receiving a lot of traffic. By strategically placing a link on that page to another on your site that you want to rank, you can pass “authority” to that page.

Technical optimization

Your headline is among the first things that users will come across when carrying out a search. This makes them important, and it’s useful to brainstorm as many variations as you can until you land on the best candidate. A smart keyword strategy tackles only enough keywords to be supported with a robust, multifaceted on-site and off-site campaign. Trying to be jack of all keyword phrases will make you master of none. Outbound links to related pages helps Google figure out your page’s topic. It also shows Google that your page is a hub of quality info. According to Gaz Hall, a UK SEO Consultant : "Data analysis should be the cornerstone of your SEO efforts. Assess how customers access your site, what they do when they get there, and where the primary exit points are."

Include relevant keywords into headings and subheadings

Sites that promote “thin,” low-value content run the risk of being penalized by Google; they also tend to have high bounce rates and low conversion rates. Remember that your success in SEO is directly proportional to the amount of effort you exert. You can find valuable data using Google Search Console (formerly called Webmaster Tools). ​This free service from Google gives website owners a wealth of information about their own sites (especially with Google Analytics set up, too). When website copy contains a wider variety of terms and keywords all relative to the same topic, it appears more natural, resulting in higher rankings. The content flows naturally, more like a conversation you might have with someone.